Tuesday, December 31, 2013

The Finishing Touch for 2013: Top 10 David Gandy posts of the year

Like every year, in summary of all the things that have happened this year, we share with you our own Top 10 list.
We look back and remember the milestones of this year to April, up to the delicious gluten free bakery of Jennifer Esposito in NYC. This is our most read post with more than 11,000 views, it was a great moment for the international significance it represented. David Gandy's first appearance in an American documentary reality TV series.
 
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1. David Gandy on 'Playing with Fire' (E! Channel) 

Friday night April 5th, David Gandy appeared on E! Channel's (US) new reality show ‘Playing with Fire’ with his friends Louis Dowler and his girlfriend, Jennifer Esposito. This was a nice chance to catch a glimpse of David away from work and enjoying a visit with two of his very good friends. Jennifer is a regular on this TV show and with her boyfriend opened 'Jennifer's Waya gluten free Bakery in NYC

Pic via Pochaway Tumblr
There is no doubt that fortune has been a constant throughout all the seasons of the Lucky Brand campaigns. The prestigious American firm owned by Fifth & Pacific Companies, has been showing us throughout the year all its freshness, personality, free spirit and laid-back lifestyle of its Southern California roots. It is therefore not surprising that the summer campaign of 2013 made the climb to # 2.



David Gandy & Missy Rayder were a picture of pure casualness for the Lucky Brand Summer 2013 campaign.
In those pictures of the collection David was photographed in white jeans, plaid short sleeve shirts, t-shirts, cut off jean shorts, flip flops and the iconic Chuck Taylor Converse sneakers.

The sexy and suggestive headline which we were surprised with in the June Cosmopolitan Magazine South Africa aroused great interest worldwide showing mastery of the game's own image and words that Cosmo masters perfectly with its 100-year history.



In bed with the hottest man in the world

It was a  late publication, but one of the most anticipated moments this year was unveiled just over a month ago. The Blue Steel Appeal's fashion auction in which David was auctioning off a date with himself took place in March and it was worth the wait.  Meet the fantastic team of Lucky Brand, traveling to Los Angeles to spend a day with David Gandy and the most difficult of all "survive" the experience and for her to recount it was almost mission impossible for my fellow admin on DjG: Melissa Feijoo-Viro.


The proverb goes "Be careful what you wish for. You just might receive it." Did I wish for this? Yes. Was it as wonderful as I thought it would be? Unlike the meaning of the proverb, my answer is, it was above and beyond everything I ever expected. But, best of all is that the proceeds of this bid go towards bettering someone else's life.

Just after the Mille Miglia, David landed in Madrid to promote the new campaign of Light Blue with the Italian designers Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana. With a tight schedule culminating with the Meditteranean Summer Cocktail event at the Santo Mauro Hotel, this was one of the interviews that garnered more attention because of stunning snapshots by Brazilian photographer Richard Ramos.



5. David Gandy talks with ¡Hola! Fashion during the Dolce&Gabbana Light Blue Launch in Madrid

David Gandy conversed with the Spanish magazine '¡Hola!' at the Meditteranean Summer Cocktail event in the San Mauro Hotel (Madrid) during the D&G's latest Light Blue fragrance campaign in May 29, 2013. 


And our most viewed videos on DjG's own YouTube channel were:

    And a final Special Mention to the most viewed videos from official channels

    And many more moments we would like to mention here that would make this an endless entry because each one is now part of the history of DjG and biography of David Gandy, each is important in itself and we invite you to enjoy them as many times as you want by visiting our website or our file.

     In the year that is about to begin in a few hours, all we have left to say is ... See you next year! HAPPY NEW YEAR to All!

    Monday, December 23, 2013

    Merry Christmas!


    We want to wish you all Merry Christmas! After writing dozens of posts on the blog this year, we pour all our good wishes into this one to send to each one of the corners of the world from where you are reading us right now.

    So within two weeks, when the holiday lights will be turned off and there isn’t any light over our streets or in our homes, when the decorations will be removed uncovering the bare walls, and when the holidays are just a few last dusty pages of a forgotten calendar, we will have enough happiness and excitement to keep alive the hope to make all the desires we have now come true.

    And now, at the end of this busy year, with countless campaigns, pictures, films, making of, events etc, one of the great administrators of the David Gandy Italian fan page on Facebook had a wonderful initiative which we want to show you and enjoy again one more time with you all. Antonella Vaccaro from the “David Gandy Fans Italia The Heart Before All” FB page asked the rest of fan pages to join us to make a dedicated Christmas video. As a result of that idea, this video was born and on it you can see the headers of all the pages. With it, we, all the administrators, present our little bit to wish everyone a Merry Christmas & Happy New Year!



    Video courtesy of Antonella Vaccaro

    Just Good Friends With David Gandy


    Natalia Barbieri of Bionda Castana, shoe designer extraordinaire, has been friends with supermodel David Gandy for almost a decade and Vogue.co.uk caught up with the photogenic twosome in the Connaught Hotel's Champagne Bar to find out.
     


    How did they meet? What do they have in common? Is fashion all they talk about? What was it like becoming work colleagues to collaborate on short film David Gandy's Goodnight? Why is David Gandy "always friends with girls"? And, most importantly, can men and women really be friends?



    Source: Vogue.co.uk

    Friday, December 20, 2013

    What David Gandy wants for Christmas (ES Magazine)


    ¡IT'S CHTISTMAS! And some of the most recognized faces from UK tell The Evening Standard what they want most this Christmas.

    Leona Lewis, Jennifer Saunders, Susan Boyle... and our very own David Gandy.




    DAVID GANDY: ALL I WANT FOR CHRISTMAS

    ‘I’ve hired an estate in Scotland for my family. There will be lots of walks and a fast car to zoom around in’

    The model, 33, wants to foster another dog

    To get into the Christmas spirit I usually spend a day in London with my mum, blitzing the Christmas shopping followed by afternoon tea at Brown’s. It has that Dickensian Christmas feel to it. I don’t host Christmas parties because I’ve never had the space. I’m in the middle of renovating a Victorian house, so next year will be my year to put up a Christmas tree like the one in National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation.

    This year I’ll be in Oban, on the west coast of Scotland. I’d heard it was beautiful up there, so I’ve hired an estate for all my family. There will be lots of walks, sherry and a fast car to zoom around in with my four nephews and nieces.

    I grew up volunteering at a dog sanctuary, but my job as a model means I travel a lot, so I could never have a dog of my own. Fostering one through Battersea Dogs Home is a nice compromise — it means I can house puppies or breeds that don’t take well to being put into kennels for four to six weeks a year. One of the first dogs I brought home was a French bulldog called Patch. I never thought I’d fall in love with a French bulldog. That’s the point. You can’t go to Battersea and say, ‘I want this breed, I want this age’ — it’s the dog that finds you. All I want for Christmas is to foster another dog like Chico.

    My favourite spot for walking dogs in London is the Thames Path — it’s practically on my doorstep in Fulham and it was where I trained for the marathon last year. I like the solitude and it gives you time to think. How do I stay fashionable on a walk? My essentials are a Barbour jacket and a coffee. DA

    To make a donation, visit battersea.org.uk

    Source: Standard.co.uk

    Thursday, December 19, 2013

    David Gandy for Esquire Mexico (December 2013)

    David Gandy, the leading british supermodel from Select, granted an interview for the Latin-american edition of Esquire Magazine. With the unmistakable background of Milan's streets and under the profesional lens of the international photographer John Russo, this splendid street session in which David Gandy is once more the Italian man suited up in Dolce & Gabbana along with an interesting interview which looks back at his beginnings, his present and next projects.


    BTS Screencaps

     
     
     
     
    Shoot by John Russo







    Spanish version



    English version
    Translate by DjG.com

    Written by Gerardo Monroy
    The term super model emerged in the nineties with five of the most beautiful women that have worked in the industry: Cindy Crawford, Linda Evangelista, Naomi Campbell, Claudia Schiffer and Christy Turlington. They all turned their name into a brand and transcended the boundaries of fashion: they became icons. In fact, the word was not coined to be used in the male sector. But the clearest example of intelligence and business acumen required to remain in place in a highly changing industry is undoubtedly Britain's David Gandy. No wonder his image has been on billboards in Times Square and he had an appearance in the closing of the Olympic Games in London. After an elegant photo shoot in Milan exclusively for Esquire Mexico, David talks about his beginnings and projects.

    Esquire: How did your career begin?

    David Gandy: A college roommate sent my photos to a TV competition, I won and that is how it all started. When I say that I have 13 years modeling that is summarized, as I do more than just modeling. These days I play more of a role of ambassador for brands and I don't do many photo shoots, but I continue to do covers: this year I did around 15 and last year I managed 23 worldwide. Modeling is still my daily bread, but everything else has shifted.

    Esquire: Did you ever think you'd get this far?

    David Gandy: I think that's what you aspire to. I always wanted to be on top of my profession. I consider models, actors and musicians, especially nowadays, should learn to recognize their strengths and weaknesses to get far. I remember in my early years of modeling, most of the work was commercial and not necessarily what I wanted to do, but now I realize that those years were of much observation. It helped me learn the industry and know how it worked, and to then achieve my involvement and get to where I wanted. These days I continue with the agency with which I began ... I would not be with anyone else.

    Esquire: Were you always interested in fashion or was it something that came with your work?

    David Gandy: I'm not sure I acquired this interest naturally. I think we are all interested in fashion to some extent because, otherwise, how would choose the clothes we buy and what we wear every day? My interest was never great, but it certainly has grown over 13 years of work. I've always had a fascination and eye for interior design and car bodies. Great designers like Ralph Lauren and Dolce & Gabbana design are not confined to the boundaries of fashion, but they transcend to buildings, interiors, watches and many other things.

    Esquire : In the world of modeling it is common to see new faces , which become popular for a while and then disappear completely. With a steady path as yours, what do you think it takes to stay?

    David Gandy : You must know how to build a brand. You can not rest on your laurels, you must be in constant change and movement, know how to seize opportunities when they arise. The biggest challenge today is the higher brands of clothes hiring movie stars and athletes as an image and not necessarily models. They use the name and recognition that these personalities have already built. I worked to build my brand, so that the name David Gandy signifies what it is today. I say that there are not to many jobs and I am very careful with what I do. It is always more important what you reject than what you accept. It's highly strategic: people believe that occurs naturally, but in reality there is much thought and consideration behind it.

    Esquire: Many people think that the world of fashion is superficial and they see the models as just pretty faces.

    David Gandy: It's a naive way of thinking. The fashion industry is very closed and not necessarily tangible. These days, magazines are doing a great job in trying to change this view. I write for The Telegraph, Vogue.com and some other publications, and contributed to change that idea. The vision many people have of male models is something like in the Zoolander film, and that does not help us much. There are many intelligent models that have built an empire with their name.

    Esquire: How do you choose the topics you write about in these publications?

    David Gandy: All publications give me a lot of freedom. For men's magazines I write mostly about cars and the models that I would like to try or have. There always has to be a relationship with fashion in what I write, but I try to focus my writing on design and art.

    Esquire: Where does your passion for cars come from?

    DG: Since I was little. I do not know who I inherited it from, since neither my parents or grandparents were interested in them. I had a journal on classical models in my hand almost since I learned to walk, and I love collecting some classics. Now I'm remodeling a 1950's Mercedes Benz.

    Esquire: How was your experience running the legendary Mille Miglia?

    DG: Awesome. I had the opportunity to drive a 1950's Jaguar with my friend Yasmin Le Bon in the heart of Italy, and ended in a good position. I hope to do next year.

    Esquire: You're the Dolce & Gabbana man, how did you meet Stefano and Domenico?

    DG: Early in my career I was selected for one of their shows. I did not see them for five years, nor had communication with them. But during a birthday party for Mariano Vivanco, a photographer who works closely with them and has taken the photos of much of my book, I connected with them again and they selected me as the image of their campaign. Since then we have had a very good relationship, and in 2006 we began negotiations for Light Blue.

    Esquire: How was it working with model Bianca Balti and photographer Mario Testino for the campaign of that fragrance?

    DG: Bianca is the perfect Lady Blue, she has a stunning Mediterranean beauty, she is the ideal Italian woman. Testino is a good friend of mine and I've worked with him in the past. This time the weather was not on our side, the sea was very choppy, but it was a very good experience and we had fun.

    Esquire: How did the idea for the book made in collaboration with Dolce & Gabbana arise?

    DG: It was initially an idea of Domenico Dolce and in reality did not seem very appealing. This is a compilation of all my work with them and with Mariano Vivanco. My condition in accepting was that the profits generated were to go an Italian charity. To Domenico that seemed a good idea and we finished it up in a couple of months.

    Esquire: How was the selection of the charity made?

    DG: It is related to the Italian arts. For Stefano and Domenico art and design are extremely important, so I left that decision in their hands and did a great job.

    Esquire: You've entered the world of mobile applications. Tell us about it.

    DG: The two things that people always ask me are about fitness and personal style, so I decided to make applications in this regard. We live in a digital world where it is increasingly common to have all on one device without printed paper. I was always intrigued by the world of apps, and I think that is the best way to get information to as many people as possible.

    Monday, December 16, 2013

    David Gandy talks with 'Dorian Magazine' (Sweden)

    #23 Dorian Magazine (Winter 2013)

    MADE IN ESSEX

    After six years as the face of Dolce & Gabbana. David is now a global body image ambassador. David opens up to us just how he reached the peak of the fashion world in those white swim trunks.

    In an industry dominated by skinny boys, it’s a wonder David Gandy ever made it as one of the world’s most successful male models. But it seems Gandy is the first man you think about when it comes to men’s fashion.

    Born into a working class family in Essex, England, David James Gandy never dreamed that he would one day end up as one of the most sought after men in the fashion world.

    His self-confessed “lumpy build” failed to turn heads where girls were concerned, meaning that he missed out on sex during his oh-so-important teenage years, but it wasn’t to last. Everything changed during David’s college years when he blossomed into the chiseled, 6ft 3 inches-tall man we all recognize.

    His transformation from an ugly ducking quickly helped him win a televised model search competition in Britain, and later secured him a job on the books at London’s Select Models. The latter led him to becoming the lead male model for Italian designers Dolce & Gabbana in 2005 and after years in the shadows, Gandy finally turned heads in 2007 when an advert for their fragrance Light Blue was erected on a 50ft billboard in Times Square, New York.

    His muscular build has not only put him firmly on the fashion map but also forced some of the world’s biggest menswear labels to up a gear and move to a more masculine standard.

    Today, David continues to stand tall among the fashion world. His current projects include writing a blog for the British Vogue and car reviews for British GQ, as well as helping to raise the profile of many charities.



      
    DM: So David, have you always been beautiful?

    DG: When I popped out at birth, apparently the first thing the nurse said to my mum was. “Look at the size of those legs and look at the size of that bum”.

    DM: Were you a good looking teenager?

    DG: I was tall when I was younger but I grew out first and so I had a lot of puppy fat.

    So around age 16 or 17, the time when you want to go out and start having sex and dating, that’s the time God decided I should be on my large side. Then luckily, I grew up, I shot up to 6ft 3’ and I was actually a skinny version of myself although I was still big. There still wasn’t as much sex as I would have liked. It was a hard time!

    DM: Was your big build ever a problem during your years on the catwalk?

    DG: I wasn’t told I was fat, but I was told things by some big names in fashion because I didn’t fit the clothing. Not because I was too big, though, just because I didn’t fit the clothes. I never fitted into sample sizes. I never have.

    DM: how does it feel to be surrounded by stunning models all the time for work?

    DG: Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. I do work with some of the most beautiful women in the world, so I’m very fortunate, but it’s much more than that. A certain type of person would be attracted to that first, but once you strip everything away it’s all about if someone makes you laugh and what their personality is like. Sometimes I can’t have a laugh with some of the most beautiful women in the world. I can’t connect with them. You don’t see the beauty, so everyone is different.

    DM: Do you feel there is too much pressure on male and female models to keep looking good?

    DG: There is much more pressure on women than there is on guys. I met two old friends recently and we asked where each other had been, as we hadn’t seen each other for ages. One of them said. “By the look of it, you’ve been down the cake shop”.

    But it was a joke so we all burst out laughing. But you probably couldn’t say that to a group of girls or a woman. That’s the pressure. But there isn’t that same pressure on men; we don’t sit around talking about our weight.

    DM: Do you think the fashion industry is changing and becoming more accepting to models of different sizes?

    DG: Some advertisers don’t use high fashion models now. The Dove commercials (they’re not fashion advertiser) use women of all sizes and shapes.

    DM: Have you ever felt insecure about the way you look?

    DG: Yes, God, absolutely. There’s more pressure now than any other time in my life because of the accolades I’ve got. I don’t feel like I can step out of the house now in a pair of tracksuit bottoms and a T-shirt and just walk down the road. There is a lot of pressure and a lot of insecurities. We changed the male fashion industry. But now I’m 33, I look at the younger guys coming in and they’re amazing looking with better bodies, so handsome and a lot younger. So of course there are insecurities. I go to my agency and meet those guys, and I’m very competitive. I think those guys are ten times better looking than I am.

    DM: How did life change when you got your job with Dolce & Gabbana?

    DG: It changed my life and it changed the industry, as back then it was full of the Dior guys. They were quite thin and skinny. We wanted to create an iconic commercial. People always think I live that life – that I’m always in a dinghy from the aftershave advert – but I don’t. That does not happen.

    DM: Can you tell us how you muster up those amazing Light Blue aftershave adverts?

    DG: We always do it in Capri, off the coast of Italy. We’ve done three now in the same location and we always use a holiday home to get changed. But on the last shoot I accidentally used a family’s bathroom by mistake. I went to get changed and I ran up to one of the bungalow things. I’m sitting there on the loo and looking around, and I think. “Why have the crew brought all their toiletries with them?” Anyway, I got off, put my pants out and walked out. At that point I realized I had somehow gone into a bungalow that had been rented by a family. My Italian isn’t the best and I said to the family. “You might not want to go in there for a while”.

    DM: Do you have to change much on those shoots?

    DG: You get a fresh pair of pants for every take, and there is someone who will take a look at your crotch to make sure it looks right.

    DM: Tell us about your diet. How do you make sure you always look good?

    DG: I don’t like the word diet. Food is a lifestyle. The word diet is a fad and your body will always revert back quickly to the way it was. It’s a matter of educating people. People are getting bigger around the world and the UK is the most obese nation in Europe now, so it really is a case of educating people about nutrition. Not all fats are bad, your body needs fat, but it’s the saturated fats that are bad. People think some foods don’t contain fats but they do contain sugar. I don’t eat in the morning – it’s apparently the worst thing you can do as once you start eating, your metabolism starts and you are burning calories straight away.

    DM: How do you manage what you can?

    DG: One of the most important dietary and nutritional requirements is protein. People often think that you should only eat protein when you are weight training, or that if you eat too much protein you will gain size and muscle. How wrong could you be? In my opinion, you can’t eat enough of it. I don’t just mean when training or exercising, but on normal rest days it helps your body and muscles to repair. Proteins can also help break down unwanted fat. Actually, I can’t tell you enough about how essential proteins are. Let me put it this way. Protein is the most abundant component of the human body, and we all know how important it is that we drink water. Getting enough protein in our diet can be difficult and also many people don’t want to give up certain treats in life (for example, ice cream)

    DM: What has growing older taught you?

    DG: I am much more comfortable in my own skin now than I ever have been. Before, I was trying to either prove something to myself or other people, but now I’m just happy being me, really.

    DM: You have dated many beautiful women. Who are you seeing now?

    DG: I’m single at the moment. I don’t know how that happens. I’m not too picky. I am very busy but everyone says that when they are not in a relationship.

    DM: David Beckham has done wonders with his underwear range, why don’t you launch your own?

    DG: Dolce & Gabbana were first with the white pants and they just followed. The way the industry has gone is that brands now pick celebrities rather than models, but we could see that happening, Beckham is an amazing ambassador for the UK though.

    DM: What does the future hold for you?

    DG: I’m 33 now. I don’t know how long I’ll continue but Kate Moss and Naomi are top of their game.

    Source: Scans courtesy of @Anne_DK (Denmark)

    Friday, December 13, 2013

    David Gandy Attends The Style For Soldiers Christmas Party

    Last night, December 12, 2013, David Gandy attended the Style for Soldiers Christmas party in London. Style for Soldiers is a charitable incentive founded by Emma Willis. It was set up to bring luxurious gifts to service men and women who were injured in conflict. 


    David Gandy with Emma Willis, Jo Wood and Harold Tillman

    Thursday, December 12, 2013

    David Gandy talks with ¡Hola! during the Diageo's Game Changer Reception in Madrid

    During last nights Diageo's Game Changer reception in Madrid, hosted by Johnnie Walker, David Gandy spoke briefly with Maria Palacios from Hola! Magazine about the male icons he admires, his family in Spain and about future projects. He ended the interview by bidding everyone a Happy Holiday and happy 2014.

    ¡Hola! Spanish Magazine #3622 January 2014

    Wednesday, December 11, 2013

    David Gandy Attends Diageo Game Changers Reception in Madrid

    Last night, December 10, 2013, David Gandy attended the Diageo Game Changers Reception for Johnnie Walker Blue Label hosted at the residence of the British Ambassador to Spain, Simon Manley. The reception also hosted some of Spain's famous celebrities like the former Miss Spain Juncal Rivero, Arancha Del Sol, fashion journalist Clara Courel, Boris Izaguirre, Unax Ugalde and bullfighter Oscar Higares to name a few.



       With British Ambassador Simon Manley and Clara Courel